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Transforming the Impossible into "I'm Possible" -- Writer's Poke #418






1. Is it possible to visit all of the countries in the world? 

Yes it is. Chris Guillebeau spent the last five years visiting all 193 countries recognized by the United Nations (or more than 270 countries, regions, and territories as calculated by the Traveler’s Century Club). How did he do it? Was he independently wealthy? Nope. He was just a regular guy who wanted to do something and found a way to do it.

2. Is it possible to walk the entire Great Wall of China?

Yes it is. Robert Loken spent 601 days walking roughly 6000 kilometers (just under 4000 miles).  How did he do it? First, he thought about it for a long time – 20 years. Then, he made a commitment to do it. Obviously someone doesn’t just say, “I’m going to go walk the Great Wall of China,” and board the first plane to Beijing. It takes quite a bit of planning, and a willingness to temporally put your life on hold. But when Loken was ready, he quit his job, sold his house, and lived his dream.

3. Is it possible for a blind man to climb the highest mountain in the world?

Yes it is. Erik Weihenmayer has not only conquered Mt. Everest, but he has also climbed the highest summits on all seven continents.  In his autobiography, he suggests that anyone can achieve his accomplishments, and he basically rejects using blindness as an excuse. Set a goal, he says, and work to achieve it.

These three individuals would all agree that it’s vital to have help and support from friends and family, but in the end, it was their inner motivation, determination, and drive that helped each of them turn the impossible into shining examples of “I’m possible.”

“What would you attempt to do if you knew you could not fail?” – Robert Schuller




Comments

  1. Excellent! I like it! Now the next question I would pose is, "Are there big challenges that are not really worth conguering?". Well, something along that mind. Maybe with regard to this current list if very difficult things that were accomplished, "Of what value other than the perhaps very important sense of personal accomplishment, did any of these amount to?"

    Please don't think I am "putting down" these people or their accomplishments. Nor am I putting down this "Poke". I am just wondering if there is something deeper.

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